Seminar: Reinforcement learning to predict sensor signals during walking in animal models and humans

Title: Towards Human–AI SafetySpeaker: Ashley Dalrymple, Assistant Professor, Dept of Biomedical Engineering at the U 2/27/24 – 2pm in WEB L102 Abstract: Walking is how we navigate our environments, explore, and get from place-to-place. After injury to the nervous system, such as with paralysis caused by spinal cord injury or stroke, walking is often impaired. Regaining the ability to walk is of high importance to people with paralysis. Currently, clinical rehabilitation methods can only take a patient so far in terms of the recovery of function. We aim to augment the rehabilitation using electrical stimulation and/or powered orthoses. However, the extent...

Read More

Seminar: Towards Human–AI Safety

Title: Towards Human–AI SafetySpeaker: Prof. Andrea Bajcsy at CMU 2/20/24 – 2pm in WEB L102 Abstract:As generative artificial intelligence (AI) interacts with people at an unprecedented scale—from behavior predictors that guide autonomous cars’ decision-making to language models that converse with millions of end-users—the problem of human–AI safety has exploded in interest. However, the safety consequences of an AI model’s outputs cannot be determined in an isolated context: they are tightly coupled with the responses and behavior of human users over time. My group has been formalizing this research challenge by unifying ideas from machine learning with control theory, which rigorously...

Read More

Seminar: Smart and Autonomous Robots for Surgery

Axel Krieger, PhD Assistant Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering Johns Hopkins University Date: Feb 13 Time: 2-2:50pm Room: WEB L102 Abstract: Robotic assisted surgery (RAS) systems, incorporate highly dexterous tools, hand tremor filtering, and motion scaling to enable a minimally invasive surgical approach, reducing collateral damage and patient recovery times. However, current state-of-the-art telerobotic surgery requires a surgeon operating every motion of the robot, resulting in long procedure times and inconsistent results. The advantages of autonomous robotic functionality have been demonstrated in applications outside of medicine, such as manufacturing and aviation. A limited form of autonomous RAS with pre-planned...

Read More

Seminar: Interactive Policy Summarization: Explaining Robot Behavior to Human Users

Date: Feb 6 Time: 2-2:50pm Room: WEB L102 Title: Interactive Policy Summarization: Explaining Robot Behavior to Human Users Abstract: We are steadily moving towards a future where humans work with robotic assistants, robotic teammates, and even robotic tutors. Yet, human users often have little knowledge of how robots work or will respond in a new situation. To ensure safe and effective use of robots, training human users regarding the robots that they work with is imperative. In pursuit of this imperative, this talk will introduce AI Teacher: an explainable AI algorithm that summarizes robot policies via demonstrations, aiming to improve...

Read More

Seminar: Anatomics: Co-engineering Body and Machine to Improve Bionic Performance

Date: Jan 30 Time: 2-2:50pm Room: WEB L102 Title: Anatomics: Co-engineering Body and Machine to Improve Bionic Performance Abstract: Bionic systems are no longer the stuff of science fiction. Exoskeletons and prostheses restore mobility to people with physical disabilities, and augment able-bodied performance. Although a complete bionic system is made up of biological structures (“the body”) and robotic mechanisms (“the machine”), the traditional development approach focuses solely on engineering the machine. As a result, even the most advanced bionic systems are subject to fundamental limitations of the human body. In this seminar, Prof. Clites will discuss his research in the nascent...

Read More

Robotics Seminar: Human–Robot Empowerment: Human Neuromusculoskeletal Modeling For Improved Collaborative & Rehabilitative Robots

Date: Jan 23rd Time: 2-2:50pm Room: WEB L102   Title: Human–Robot Empowerment: Human Neuromusculoskeletal Modeling For Improved Collaborative & Rehabilitative Robots   Abstract: Robotic systems are a promising assistive technology to augment the capabilities of both healthy users and those with motor disabilities. At the same time, those systems often fail to model important aspects of the human user, and thus act in ways that are dangerous or simply not consistent with the user’s intent. In this talk, I will give an overview of my new lab’s plans to address this challenge from multiple avenues, leveraging sensing and modeling technologies — drawn...

Read More

Fall Robotics Seminar – Jenna Burnett

Jenna Burnett, a postdoc here at the U in the Department of Health and Kinesiology who does exciting work on biomechanics, bringing together hardware and data-driven modeling with a deep knowledge of kinesiology. Thursday, December 7th at 1pm WEB 1250 Bio: Jenna Burnett is a post-doc in the Department of Health and Kinesiology. She received a BS in Physics and Mathematics at Purdue University in 2015, before completing her MS in Kinesiology, with a focus on Biomechanics, at Iowa State University in 2017. Her master’s thesis investigated bone strain before and after a long distance run to exhaustion using...

Read More

Seminar – Designing Exoskeletons to Enhance Human Mobility

Steve Collins, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Director, Stanford Biomechatronics Laboratory Friday, Dec. 1st at 3:00pm MEK 3550 ABSTRACT: Exoskeletons and active prosthetic limbs could improve mobility for hundreds of millions of people, but two serious challenges must first be overcome: we need ways of identifying what a device should do to benefit an individual user, and we need cheap, efficient hardware that can do it. In this talk, we will describe an approach to the design of wearable robots based on versatile emulator systems and algorithms that automatically customize assistance, which we call human-in-the-loop optimization. We will...

Read More

Fall Robotics Seminar: Drew Sabelhaus

Drew Sabelhaus from BU, who does exciting research on soft robot design and control, will be presenting as part of the Fall Robotics Seminar. Thursday, November 9th at 1pm WEB 1250 Learn more about his research: Advancing the Safety of Soft Robots for Human Interactions Bio: Prof. Andrew Sabelhaus’ research takes a control-oriented approach to the locomotion of soft and flexible robots, spanning problems in modeling, feedback, and mechanical design. His work seeks to make soft robots practical and applicable by balancing feedback control with natural, embodied intelligence, allowing a robot to safely complete tasks in unstructured environments....

Read More